Air Force Featured Stories

  • Her last goodbye

    “The worst part of it all was just thinking about what she was thinking in those final moments as she was standing in the bathroom all alone, and I can’t imagine just how lonely she must’ve felt,” said Senior Airman Brianna Bowen, 1st Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller.

  • Air Force Widow vows to bring awareness to invisible wounds

    Air Force veteran Stacey Pavenski, 46, of Palm Bay, Florida, has post traumatic stress disorder, but she didn’t get it from serving in combat. It came from her husband’s combat struggles that drove him to take his own life in their bedroom, Sept. 18, 2017, while she was in the kitchen. He was 45.

  • Resources and support for pregnancy and infant loss

    October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month, where organizations and communities everywhere host events to commemorate the lives parents and families have lost due to miscarriage, stillbirth and infant loss. However, Rendon is on a mission to make pregnancy and infant loss awareness more

  • Air Force psychologist considers social media’s role in suicide prevention

    Social media connects us to more people than ever before, but these contacts may not be the type that help build resiliency. Strong interpersonal connections play a critical role in suicide prevention. Used correctly, social media can be an important tool in the suicide prevention toolbox for

  • AF launches yearlong ‘Cyber Secure’ campaign

    The Air Force message is clear -- October may be National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, but with the continuous advancement of technology and evolving cyber threats, one month of cybersecurity awareness is no longer enough.

  • The sun shines on Ironman

    Staff Sgt. Joshua Hull, the NCO in charge of the Minot Air Force Base Honor Guard here recently accepted the challenge to compete at the IRONMAN Sept. 21, in Lake Tahoe, California.

  • Suicide prevention: What you can do

    September 8th through the 14th is National Suicide Prevention Week. However, many people are hesitant to get involved in the discussion on the topic of suicide prevention. This is concerning because the ability to get involved and intervene is critical to saving lives.

  • Note to breast cancer: 'I am not your victim'

    What is often forgotten in the sea of pink are the individuals on the front lines who are actually fighting the disease. In the three months between the time football players stop wearing pink shoes and the Super Bowl, roughly 58,000 women and 500 men in the U.S. will be diagnosed with breast