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Contact Information

Sexual Assault Response Coordinator
Kim Shirley
661-277-7272 (SARC)
kimberly.shirley@us.af.mil

SAPR Victim Advocate
Carolyn Graves
661-277-4988
carolyn.graves@us.af.mil

SAPR - Safe Helpline

Edwards AFB Sexual Assault Prevention and Response

Edwards Air Force Base Sexual Assault Prevention and Response: Sexual Assault Response Coordinators (SARCs) and Victim Advocates are available at major DoD installations to assist victims (survivors) of sexual assault. The Edwards AFB SARC serves as the single point of contact for integrating and coordinating sexual assault victim (survivor) care 24/7, 365 days a year. The SARC Office is also responsible for providing Sexual Assault Prevention training throughout the installation.

Help is just a phone call away: If you have been sexually assaulted, please call the Edwards SARC Office at 661-277-SARC (7272), Monday through Friday, 0730-1630. Additionally, Edwards AFB has set up a 24-hour hotline at 661-209-0115.

What is sexual assault?

Intentional sexual contact characterized by the use of force, threats, intimidation, or abuse of authority or when the victim does not or cannot consent.

As used by the Department of Defense, the term "sexual assault" includes a broad category of sexual offenses consisting of the following specific Uniform Code of Military Justice offenses: rape, sexual assault, aggravated sexual contact, abusive sexual contact, forcible sodomy (forced oral or anal sex), or attempts to commit these offenses.

These offenses are defined in Article 120, Article 120b, and Article 125 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and can be reviewed here.

Victim Advocate Program

Air Force victim advocates provide essential support, liaison services and care to a sexual assault victim.

Victim advocates are active duty military personnel and DoD civilian employees selected by the SARC and who have completed a 40-hour training course.

Victim advocates are volunteers who must possess the maturity and experience to assist in very sensitive situations.

Responsibilities include:

· Providing crisis intervention, referral and ongoing non-clinical support.
· Providing information on available options and resources to assist the victim in making informed decisions about the case.
· Services will continue until the victim states support is no longer needed.
· Does not provide counseling or other professional services to a victim.
· May be present with the victim, at the victim's request, during investigative interviews and medical examinations.
Become a Volunteer

The Air Force core values and respect are the foundation of our Wingman culture--a culture in which we look out for each other and take care of each other. Incidents of sexual assault corrode the very fabric of our Wingman culture; therefore, we must strive for an environment where this behavior is not tolerated and where all Airmen are respected.

For more information on becoming a victim advocate, please contact the Edwards SAPR office at 277-2772.

Guidelines for Reporting

If you have been the victim of sexual assault, remember...

· Immediately report any assault; however evidence may still be collected up to 5 days after the incident.
· Never hesitate to get help.
· Do not change clothes (if you do, bring soiled clothing in a paper bag--not plastic).

You don't have to be alone!

1. The assault was NOT your fault. You did not cause it to happen.
2. People are here to help. We are committed to supporting you and
your family members in the most sensitive and private way possible.
3. There is no "right way" in dealing with sexual assault. It is okay to be angry and important to stand up for yourself as you are ready. Let the SARC/victim advocate put you in touch with all the resources and assistance available to you.
4. Take care of yourself and ask for what you need. Remember, before washing or cleaning up, seek medical attention.

What are my options?

I've been assaulted, what are my options?

There are two options for reporting sexual assault, Restricted and Unrestricted Reports.

RESTRICTED REPORTS

Allows an active duty members and family members over the age of 18 years to report allegations of sexual assault to the Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC), Victim Advocates (VAs) or a military Chaplain without triggering an investigation. The state of California is a mandated reporting state meaning if you report a sexual assault to law enforcement or medical providers (including military) they must report it.

UNRESTRICTED REPORTS

Allows personnel stated above to report allegations of sexual assault to the SARC, VA or Military Chaplain as well as the member's chain of command or the AFOSI and a formal investigation will occur. Details of the report will only be provided to those with a need to know.

Independent Reporting (This is an unrestricted report made by someone other than the victim)
If you tell anyone, who subsequently notifies command, SFS, or OSI, or if someone observes the assault and notifies command, SFS, or OSI, an investigation is launched. This becomes unrestricted reporting.
The SARC/Victim Advocate are available to attend to victim needs.

Sexual Assault
For the purpose of this Directive and SAPR awareness training and education, the term "sexual assault" is defined as intentional sexual contact characterized by use of force, threats, intimidation, or abuse of authority or when the victim does not or cannot consent. The term includes a broad category of sexual offenses consisting of the following specific UCMJ offenses: rape, sexual assault, aggravated sexual contact, abusive sexual contact, forcible sodomy (forced oral or anal sex), or attempts to commit these acts. (AFI 36-6001)

Consent
"Consent" is defined as words or overt acts indicating a freely given agreement to the sexual conduct at issue by a competent person. An expression of lack of consent through words or conduct means there is no consent. Lack of verbal or physical resistance or submission resulting from the one accused use of force, threat of force, or placing another person in fear does not constitute consent. A current or previous dating relationship by itself or the manner of dress of the person involved with the accused in the sexual conduct at issue shall not constitute consent. There is no consent where the person is sleeping or incapacitated, such as due to age, alcohol or drugs, or mental incapacity.